Wildlights – Self Titled – Album Review

wildlightsWildlights
Self Titled
Season of Mist
Release Date: 21 August 2015
Reviewer: Tristan Peterson

Hailing from North Carolina, Wildlights are a self proclaimed “Heavy Rock” duo carrying strong progressive and blues influences with a subtle tinge of the psychedelic. Basically, what would happen is Solstafir took their meds. (Which makes a sick kind of sense, as they’re both with Season of Mist).

“What? No preamble?” I hear readers of my previous reviews ask. Well, with reviewing a rather unpretentious album the likes of Wildlights’ self-titled album, any kind of preface would be meandering and pointless, which fits in with the albums overall feel, and not with any intent to insult.

There is an aimless quality to the songs on offer here which is, at once refreshing, as well as a little bewildering. Beginning with Anchors, Wildlights waste no time in showing what they are all about; a cruise-paced, rock oriented and relaxed band that does not really strive for the highly emotive. There is not too much in the way of great variety on offer here, though each song has its own particular charms, all settling nicely into a laid back sensibility.

The album stakes claim in a big, juicy middle ground of solid tempos and journeyman melodies, with no song being too quick paced or too drudging. See what I mean by a bit bewildering? Still, such a thing can be appreciated as a part of the charm of the album. Whilst there is a droning, almost sluggish, element present, especially with songs like New Year Repeat and Big Frontier, the progressive influences help keep it from being a chore to sit through.

This is not the kind of album you would hear at a club or even really have playing to pump you up; Wildlights is one of those albums you have playing in your car during a long drive. It’s some good road music with an authentic Mid-Western U.S. feel that will be a treat for lovers of rock with a touch of blues. If you are looking for something a little more fiery and aggressive, this won’t do it for you, but there is a good road-trip vibe that is enjoyable.

I give it a selective recommendation for those who have a taste for Queens of The Stone Age and other bands in that vein.

Written by Robyn Morrison

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